Blooming Glen Farm | tatsoi
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tatsoi Tag

Hooray for the start of the CSA! I can finally start eating my vegetables again. Of course we have all been anxiously waiting for the familiar stand-bys, but one of my favorite things about getting vegetables from the CSA share is the variety of new vegetables that it exposes me to.

This week, we’ve got two veggies you might not be familiar with cooking: Tatsoi and Hakurei Turnips.

Tatsoi is an Asian cooking green closely related to bok choy. Its nickname is “spinach mustard,” which is appropriate since it has a spinach-like texture, and a mild mustardy flavor. It can be eaten raw in a salad, steamed, stir-fried, or thrown in a soup.

Hakurei (pronounced hawk-ur-eye) turnips are also Asian in origin. Sweet and tender, they are nothing like a big purple-top turnip you may be familiar with. No need to peel or cook, they can be eaten raw if you want. They do have a mild spiciness reminiscent of their cousin the radish. The greens can also be sauteed, but they tend to be on the bitter side.

Spring Stir-fry with Tatsoi and Turnips

To prepare hakurei turnips, trim the greens and the little roots from the bulbs of one bunch of turnips. Slice the turnips thinly.

In a very hot wok or large frying pan, melt one tablespoon coconut oil (or other vegetable oil). Add prepped hakruei turnips and one bunch of spring onions (including the green parts, roughly chopped). Stir-fry until turnips are tender, about 4 minutes.

While turnips and spring onions are cooking, roughly chop leaves and stems of one bunch of tatsoi. Add to hot pan and cook until stems are tender and greens are just wilted, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

Toss vegetables in 2 tablespoons peanut butter, 3 tablespoons soy sauce, 1 tablespoon sesame oil, and 2 teaspoons light vinegar (such as rice wine vinegar, apple cider, or white wine vinegar). For the spice lovers out there, try adding a sprinkle of red pepper flakes. Serve over quick-cooking rice noodles or hearty brown rice. For more protein as a main dish, add stir-fried chicken or tofu.

Serves 2 as a main dish, 4 as side dish

Text and photography by Kate Darlington – Blooming Glen Farm second year intern, Colorado native, and food lover.

This Thai-style curry is a light, mild version of the one I usually get at my favorite Thai restaurant. Filled with seasonal veggies such as sweet potatoes, spinach and cauliflower cooked in a creamy peanut sauce, this vegetarian dish is packed with flavor. You can adjust the amount of curry if you like a more bold flavor and substitute the tofu with chicken or beef if you like. Serve alongside brown rice.

Serves 4-5.

Massamun Curry

-In a large pot, heat 2 tablespoons of coconut or olive oil. Chop 1 yellow onion and saute for a few minutes until onion starts to sweat. Throw in 3 cloves of minced garlic and 1 inch cube of fresh ginger, also minced finely. Saute for 2 more minutes.

-Add in:

1 tablespoon of mild curry powder
1/2 teaspoon of salt
1/2 teaspoon of red pepper flakes (only if you want it a little spicy)
1 cup of coconut milk
2 tablespoons of peanut butter

-Stir all the ingredients together before adding 2 cups of broth or stock and 2 cups of sweet potatoes, diced. Bring to a boil then turn down to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes with the lid on.

-Break up 2 small cauliflower heads into florets (about 2 cups) and add in. Cook for 10 more minutes with the lid on.

-Roughly chop 1 bunch of fresh spinach (or substitute with tatsoi or bok choy) and throw in the pot, mixing until wilted. Cook for 5 more minutes with the lid off.

-Let cool slightly and serve on top of brown rice. ENJOY!

Recipe and photos by Jana Smart- Blooming Glen Farm employee and frequent creator of creative recipes using farm fresh seasonal ingredients.