Blooming Glen Farm | Middle of the lake
9903
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Middle of the lake

Middle of the lake

It’s almost August, and here at the farm we liken it to the “middle of the lake” effect. We are equidistant from all shores, and as we tell ourselves and our crew, we just need to keep paddling. The farm has a fuzzy feral look about it- the weeds are higher than we’d like them to be (break out the weed wacker!), the mosquitos and horse flies are taunting us as we harvest, disease is encroaching on the tomatoes, and the heat just exacerbates how tired we all feel. When the day finally ends with the setting sun and we step inside our homes they mirror the farm outside- dirty, with piles of dishes and laundry and loads of unchecked off to-do lists- and with most of us working 6 days a week, we barely have any time to cook the food we are growing, let alone preserve the bounty.

7/28/15, on-farm share #9

7/28/15, on-farm share #9

So how do we keep the paddles moving? We remind ourselves and our crew that the work we are all doing is important, that we each play an integral part in the season long effort to grow food on 40 acres of land. We are impacting people’s daily lives by providing organic nutrient-rich produce raised sustainably and with heart, and through that, a community connection to something greater than the worries we might have over will we have enough produce?, enough variety?, enough income? to provide for us all.

Breaking new ground- about 5 acres back by the woods.

Breaking new ground- about 8 acres back by the woods.

Though we are tired, we all feel physically strong, and we can find joy and satisfaction in the small things- the sweet ripe flavor of a juicy cantaloupe and the discovery of a new variety we love, the tiny sundrenched package of a cherry tomato bursting with summer heat, the soft warm feel on bare feet of newly plowed earth, the myriad of butterflies flitting amongst the bright colored patches of flowers, the synchronicity of working as a team to achieve not just daily but season long goals.

Storage onions harvested and being laid out to dry and cure.

Storage onions harvested and being laid out to dry and cure.

We hope that you feel the same way, that in some small way our work has touched your life for the positive. That this good food grown by so many hands and with such intention nourishes and supports you in your own work, and that the connection it brings to community and the earth ripples out though all our lives in positive ways out into the world. August on a veggie farm is not easy, but we can see the distant shore ahead, and we’re gonna keep paddling!

Post and photos by Tricia Borneman, Blooming Glen farmer and co-owner. Tricia and her husband Tom have been farming together since 2000. Blooming Glen Farm is entering its 10th season bringing high quality certified organic vegetables, herbs, fruits and cut flowers to our local community. Tricia is passionate about food, art and nature and the intersection and expression of all three.

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